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Accessing Treatment

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) can be an extremely isolating, upsetting and distressing illness.  But while it can be chronic, it is also a very treatable medical condition, and seeking early intervention and appropriate treatment is the key to long term recovery.

However, for many people with OCD they are unsure how to access treatment, or sometimes when they do reach out for help, they are faced with a system where the most appropriate and efficient treatment is not always made available.  In this guide we aim to help you understand what treatment you should expect and how to access it through various stages of the treatment process.

Find out more about which treatment to request..

Treatment to ask for

There are a myriad of treatments out there, but there is only one treatment that is shown to be effective for treating OCD; a talking therapy called Cognitive-Behaviour Therapy (CBT) which can be used with or without medication.

Click to read more.

 
Sometimes some people with OCD are worried about opening up about their OCD, so   if you are not sure what to say to your GP, then we have created a GP   Ice-Breaker printout to help you break the ice

GP Ice-Breaker

Sometimes people with OCD are worried about opening up about their OCD.  If this applies to you, and you are not sure what to say to your GP, then we have created a GP Ice-Breaker printout to help you through that first appointment.

Click to read more.

 
What if GP says no to CBT

What if a GP says no to CBT?

Sometimes gaining access to treatment is not always straightforward, and this guide aims to help you remove the obstacles that can occasionally stand in your way.

Click to read more.

 
Finding a Therapist.

Finding a Therapist

With the vast array of OCD treatments available, and the numerous 'online' offers of quick fix cures, we decided to take a look at what people can do when trying to find a therapist privately.

This article offers guidance on choosing the right therapist and advice on maintaining the therapeutic relationship when things go wrong.  It can be applied to both private and NHS therapists.

Click to read more.

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OCD-UK is a non-profit making charity and not associated with any other organisation. Medical information is provided for education/information purposes only, you should obtain further advice from your doctor. Any links to external websites have been carefully selected, however we are not responsible for the content of these third party websites.