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Health professionals

OCD news relevant for Health Professionals - Please also check our calendar of OCD events and workshops for Health Professionals.

Low intensity interventions do not have clinical treatment benefits

Researchers at the University of Manchester have concluded that low intensity interventions in the treatment of OCD (prior to CBT), as recommended by NICE, do not have any clinical treatment benefits. 

It’s already known that the NICE (National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence) guidelines for the treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) recommend CBT (including exposure and response prevention) for the treatment and management of OCD using a stepped care approach.

Low intensity psychological interventions are proposed at lower steps (including brief individual CBT using structured self-help materials, brief individual CBT by telephone and group CBT), moving up to more intensive psychological and pharmacological interventions at higher steps, which in reality is what OCD-UK believe the majority of patients presenting for OCD treatment should be offered. There is some preliminary evidence that self-managed therapy packages for OCD can be effective, but the NICE guidelines highlighted the need for research in to the use of low intensity therapy for the treatment of OCD.

The OCTET (Obsessive–Compulsive Treatment Efficacy Trial), led by Professor Karina Lovell at the University of Manchester, emerged from a research recommendation in NICE guidelines, which specified the need to evaluate CBT treatment intensity formats.

Attendees of our 2015 OCD-UK conference in York may remember Professor Lovell explained that the study aimed to see if using a self-help approach (either a book or a computer program), supported for a short time by a mental health practitioner, would be better than waiting for CBT.

The key objectives of the OCTET research was:

Article posted on: Sun, 16/07/2017 - 3:07pm Read more...

LIVE webinar with Prof Salkovskis - Tue 9th May

Last month we launched our inaugural LIVE webinar with Canadian OCD specialist Professor Adam Radomsky, which received fantastic feedback and reviews.

Our online webinars use modern technology to bring international OCD specialists and people affected by Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) together. The webinar is open to anybody with an interest in learning more about OCD, all you need is a good internet connection to watch and listen to the webinar straight from your internet browser on your computer or via an app on mobile devices.

Our second live webinar will take place from 6pm on Tuesday 9th May with OCD specialist Professor Paul Salkovskis.

The webinars will offer people affected by OCD the opportunity to learn from these specialists and even the ability to ask questions. We had over 60 people register for our inaugural webinar, our audience included people with OCD, family members and health professionals.

Access is once again completely free of charge for OCD-UK members, but there is a small nominal charge of just £5 for non-members. Due to limited space members still need to register to reserve their spot, but will not be charged. To register and for further details please visit the webinar website at: http://www.ocdwebinar.org

Article posted on: Wed, 12/04/2017 - 7:21pm Read more...

Podcast with Professor Paul Salkovskis

Danny Whittaker from the My Own Worst Enemy website, an online support community for anyone battling with depression or anxiety related mental health issues, recently interviewed our patron, Professor Paul Salkovskis. The result was this fascinating insight into OCD and Paul's views on everything from how he likes to refer to OCD, to views on causes and family involvement.

Article posted on: Wed, 02/11/2016 - 11:21am Read more...

IAPT Annual Report Summary - 2015/2016

NHS England

In our April members magazine, Compulsive Reading we published our summary of the 'Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC)' annual report of IAPT data for the year 2014/15. In our summary we reported that the data showed big differences in recovery rates for people seeking treatment for OCD with local IAPT services across England.

For those that don’t know what IAPT is, the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies initiative was introduced across England to improve access to psychological therapies, such as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). Each region has its own local IAPT service commissioned by local Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCG) and all with their own local name (i.e. Let’s Talk, Healthy Minds, Talk Liverpool).

The ‘Psychological Therapies Annual Report on the use of IAPT services’ is published annually and presents a picture of activity in IAPT services and of the people that used them. The report published both national data and local CCG data broken down to reports on recovery data per condition, including OCD.

Last week NHS Digital (the new name for the Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC)l) published the new and their fourth annual report of IAPT data for the 2015/16 period. We will once again review it and summarise on it in our next OCD-UK members magazine and on this website, however for those interested in stats, here is the top line from the report ( for all conditions treated, not just OCD):

Article posted on: Mon, 24/10/2016 - 10:32pm Read more...

What to expect after good quality treatment for OCD

Professor Paul Salkovskis

This week is OCD Awareness Week, and each day we will be publishing a different account of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

During OCD Awareness Week we have heard some honest and candid stories from some brave people, some of whom have commented that they know they will always have to live with OCD. So we asked an OCD specialist to talk to us about recovery and if people will always have OCD. Professor Paul Salkovskis shares his view...

What to expect after good quality treatment for OCD: Recovery, Cure, Resolution or just learning to live with it?
By Professor Paul Salkovskis (Professor of Clinical Psychology and Applied Science, Department of Psychology, University of Bath).

For OCD Awareness week 2016, I have tried to briefly tackle this tough issue at the request of OCD-UK. This is just a short piece written quickly, so please forgive me for the various things I have undoubtedly left out, and for the misunderstanding which may arise from my clumsy phrasing. 

Article posted on: Sat, 15/10/2016 - 1:31pm Read more...

Your Right to Choose - NHS Mental Health Treatment Provider

In April 2014, the then coalition government established legislation for people with mental health conditions to have the same legal right as those with physical health conditions to choose their health care provider.

The NHS stated that patients in England have the legal right to choose any clinically appropriate mental health provider that has a contract with any Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) or NHS England for the service required.

Partly because of the way the NHS England guidance was interpreted by many different health professionals and NHS services, the legislation is not something that has been widely publicised or is known about.

As we first reported to OCD-UK members in the last member’s magazine, we have been speaking with NHS England's 'Patient Choice' team to clarify the legislation and how people seeking treatment for OCD or BDD can implement it.

At the moment when a patient requires treatment they are automatically referred (or they can sometimes self-refer) to their local service within the same CCG area that they are registered with a GP. For the majority of people that will be fine, and travel restrictions may mean they can only access local services anyway. However, for others where travel is not restrictive, there may be occasions where they may wish to be referred to a different NHS service for their treatment.

Article posted on: Thu, 18/08/2016 - 1:48pm Read more...

Old Prof rides 100 miles in a day for OCD-UK

Paul riding for OCD-UK

Earlier this week we shared Stuart's story about why he is Riding 100 miles for OCD-UK this coming Sunday. Another of those #FantasticFundraisers taking part in the RideLondonSurrey100 is clinical psychologist, Professor Paul Salkovskis (pictured) who shared with our website the reason for his taking part.

I began cycling four years ago, inspired by Ashley and Jo’s example riding London to Paris for OCD-UK. When Ashley was talking to me about the possibility of his riding Land’s End to John O’Groats, I thought “I could never do that”. When I thought about it, I felt a bit of a hypocrite….I am constantly telling others that, whatever they think, they can manage to succeed with even seemingly impossible targets. Ashley and I did that ride, then another even longer one two years later, and we met some fantastic people along the way as the “awareness” bit of those rides.

Article posted on: Wed, 27/07/2016 - 2:17pm Read more...

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