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Research

Information about OCD research

Antipsychotic augmentation in SSRI treatment refractory OCD

In 2006, the National Institute of Clinical and Health Excellence (NICE) guidelines for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) recommended anti-psychotics as a class for SSRI treatment resistant OCD. Since then there as been much discussion and controversy around the effectiveness of anti-psychotics medications for the treatment of OCD, with one research project suggesting they were ineffective, faring little better than a placebo.

In a more recent research trial led by Dr David Veale, a research trial aimed to systematically review and conduct a meta-analysis on the clinical effectiveness of atypical anti-psychotics augmenting an SSRI. Two studies found aripiprazole and risperidone can for some be effective in the short-term for those who failed to respond to previous treatment with CBT and SSRI medications. The trial found that risperidone and aripiprazole can be used cautiously at a low dose as an augmentation agent in non-responders to SSRIs and CBT but should be monitored at 4 weeks to determine efficacy.

Article posted on: Mon, 23/02/2015 - 3:35pm Read more...

The Impact of Perceptions of OCD on Individuals with OCD and their family and friends.

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Research by Sian Dallimore, Dr Claire Lomax & Prof. Paul Salkovskis, University of Bath

Thank you for showing your interest in this research project. I am a Trainee Clinical Psychologist at the University of Bath working alongside Dr Claire Lomax and Prof. Paul Salkovskis. We are looking for people who are currently experiencing Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and a family member or friend who would like to take part in this study.

January Update:
Huge thanks to everyone who has taken part so far. Prof Paul Salkovskis and Sian Dallimore are still looking for another 35 people who suffer with OCD and their family member or friend to take part in research aiming to better understand the family impact of OCD. If you're interested, take a look at the further information and please get in touch! s.dallimore@bath.ac.uk

Article posted on: Sat, 17/01/2015 - 3:22pm Read more...

Development and Validation of the Reassurance Seeking Questionnaire

Please do support Brynjar by taking part in this research
Research by Brynjar Halldorsson, University of Bath

Seeking reassurance is something we all do; and for a good reason - when someone we trust tells us not to worry we tend to feel better. However, very little is known about the function of reassurance seeking in the context of emotional problems.

For this reason we have developed a new questionnaire – The Reassurance Seeking Questionnaire – that we hope will help us to understand better what reassurance seeking does to feelings of anxiety, how people seek reassurance and what motivates them to seek it and its perceived impact on people’s relationships.

We aim to compare reassurance seeking across people experiencing various emotional problems with the aim to explore and compare similarities and differences of the function of reassurance across different groups. It is our hope that increased understanding of reassurance will directly impact on treatment development for emotional problems.

Article posted on: Mon, 18/08/2014 - 12:50pm Read more...

New research looks at the effectiveness of Risperidone over CBT

New research looks at the effectiveness of Risperidone over CBT

New research published this week (11th September) provides evidence that patients with OCD for whom SSRIs have not resolved their problem respond better when psychological treatment (CBT with ERP) is added to the SSRI antidepressant compared to those that were prescribed an augmentation of a SSRI medication and Risperidone, a form of antipsychotic drug.

These findings led researchers to conclude that patients with OCD receiving SSRIs who continue to have clinically significant symptoms should be offered CBT before antipsychotics are prescribed, especially given its superior efficacy and less negative adverse effects.

Article posted on: Thu, 12/09/2013 - 11:06pm Read more...

OCD Dads Study - Summary of Findings

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By Dr Rebecca Chilvers
The Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London

What did we look at?
We were interested in finding out more about how OCD in fathers affects their perception of their parenting, whether having OCD actually changes the way fathers parent possibly in ways that might make it more likely their children will become more anxious or develop some OCD behaviours, and whether children of fathers with OCD show any more difficulties than children of fathers who do not have OCD, including looking specifically to see whether they show a greater number of OCD features.

We asked participants to fill in several questionnaires to help us look at these things as well as to complete a short task where you talked about the how you and your child got along, as well as what kind of person you felt they were.

Article posted on: Sun, 16/06/2013 - 2:32pm Read more...

New study suggests OCD tendencies affects 11% of postnatal women

A study by researchers (Miller, Chu, Gollan and Gossett) at the Northwestern University in Chicago (US) have reported that that 11% of women who have recently given birth have a much higher rate of OCD symptoms compared with 2% to 3% of the general population.

“It may be that certain kinds of obsessions and compulsions are adaptive and appropriate for a new parent, for example those about cleanliness and hygiene,” said senior author Dr Dana Gossett, “But when it interferes with normal day-to-day functioning and appropriate care for the baby and parent, it becomes maladaptive and pathologic.”

Article posted on: Tue, 05/03/2013 - 8:07pm Read more...

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