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Research

Information about OCD research

Research: Seeking help and receiving appropriate treatment for OCD

Research by Karen Robinson, University of Bath.

UPDATE April 2014: Karen Robinson, a researcher with personal experience of OCD & CBT, writes;

Thank you ever so much to all those who have participated in the questionnaire study, 'Seeking help and receiving appropriate treatment for OCD'. So far 92 people have kindly taken part. We are ever so grateful. The study will be coming to an end on 31 May 2014. If you think you might be interested in taking part before then, you would be most welcome. You can find further details on the website by clicking the 'Read More' link below, and you can contact me on: k.j.robinson@bath.ac.uk

The research project is called ‘Seeking help and receiving appropriate treatment for OCD’. It aims to identify the factors which encourage people with OCD to seek treatment, and the barriers to seeking help. It also examines whether people are offered appropriate treatment when they do seek help. Karen Robinson would like to invite you to take part.

Article posted on: Wed, 16/04/2014 - 1:13am Read more...

New research looks at the effectiveness of Risperidone over CBT

New research looks at the effectiveness of Risperidone over CBT

New research published this week (11th September) provides evidence that patients with OCD for whom SSRIs have not resolved their problem respond better when psychological treatment (CBT with ERP) is added to the SSRI antidepressant compared to those that were prescribed an augmentation of a SSRI medication and Risperidone, a form of antipsychotic drug.

These findings led researchers to conclude that patients with OCD receiving SSRIs who continue to have clinically significant symptoms should be offered CBT before antipsychotics are prescribed, especially given its superior efficacy and less negative adverse effects.

Article posted on: Thu, 12/09/2013 - 11:06pm Read more...

OCD Dads Study - Summary of Findings

Research Advert

By Dr Rebecca Chilvers
The Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London

What did we look at?
We were interested in finding out more about how OCD in fathers affects their perception of their parenting, whether having OCD actually changes the way fathers parent possibly in ways that might make it more likely their children will become more anxious or develop some OCD behaviours, and whether children of fathers with OCD show any more difficulties than children of fathers who do not have OCD, including looking specifically to see whether they show a greater number of OCD features.

We asked participants to fill in several questionnaires to help us look at these things as well as to complete a short task where you talked about the how you and your child got along, as well as what kind of person you felt they were.

Article posted on: Sun, 16/06/2013 - 2:32pm Read more...

New study suggests OCD tendencies affects 11% of postnatal women

A study by researchers (Miller, Chu, Gollan and Gossett) at the Northwestern University in Chicago (US) have reported that that 11% of women who have recently given birth have a much higher rate of OCD symptoms compared with 2% to 3% of the general population.

“It may be that certain kinds of obsessions and compulsions are adaptive and appropriate for a new parent, for example those about cleanliness and hygiene,” said senior author Dr Dana Gossett, “But when it interferes with normal day-to-day functioning and appropriate care for the baby and parent, it becomes maladaptive and pathologic.”

Article posted on: Tue, 05/03/2013 - 8:07pm Read more...

New hope for Tourettes Syndrome patients

Professor Stephen Jackson

Last night, Inside Out West Midlands and East Midlands broadcast a feature about pioneering new Tourette's research taking place at the University of Nottingham, and it can be viewed online via BBC iPlayer for the next week.

The research hopes to offer new hope for Young people with Tourette's Syndrome as a result of the pioneering work by Professor Stephen Jackson and his team at the University of Nottingham.

Because of the overlaps between OCD and Tourette's, where often a person with Tourette's may have co-morbid OCD symptoms, OCD-UK have been invited to participate in helping the researchers during the coming months.

Article posted on: Tue, 29/01/2013 - 7:22am Read more...

New national treatment centre for OCD in the West of England to be announced

Professor Paul Salkovskis at the OCD-UK conference

OCD-UK have today learned that a new NHS national treatment centre offering specialist treatment for OCD is due to open in the South West of England early next year.

We have been concerned for some time by the fact that there are very few NHS centres which can offer specialist treatment for OCD beyond the M25 circular, and as an organisation we have been actively supporting efforts to extend the availability of high quality treatment in the NHS outside of the Greater London area. We previously supported efforts to establish an OCD service in Liverpool, although this service was not commissioned.

We are therefore delighted to learn that the University of Bath and Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust are about to open a new Assessment, Treatment, Training and Research Centre which will provide, both a regional and a national clinic offering expert and highly specialist services for a range of psychological problems, particularly OCD and related problems. The provisional name for this new service is the Centre for Specialist Psychological Treatments of Anxiety and Related Problems (CSPTARP) and the Clinical Director will be Professor Paul Salkovskis (pictured), who is a long-standing supporter and patron of OCD-UK. We also understand that the centre will probably be based in South Bristol with a possible satellite centre in Swindon, and will begin accepting NHS referrals early in 2013.

Article posted on: Sat, 22/12/2012 - 9:40am Read more...

Transcept OCD medication fails trial

Transcept Pharmaceuticals announced today that a mid-stage clinical trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of TO-2061, an experimental drug for the treatment of OCD, did not meet the main goal of showing improvements in treating symptoms any better than a placebo. The data from the trial showed that TO-2061 did not meet the primary efficacy endpoint to demonstrate an improvement in OCD symptoms versus a placebo.

The trial was testing the drug in patients with OCD who had not adequately responded to treatment with approved first-line therapies.

Article posted on: Sat, 22/12/2012 - 9:00am Read more...

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